Young PR Pros podcast

Do you ever get a random connection request on LinkedIn? It is from someone who have never heard or. Or perhaps it someone you don't remember meeting. Are you the type of person who just hits accept, or are you more guarded with your LinkedIn network?

Young PR Pros' good friend William Johnson, Mr. @socialeccentric on Twitter, recently wrote an article in Career Options Magazine about what to do with LinkedIn requests from people you’ve never met.

Kristine Simpson and Julia Kent discuss the subject and give their experience with adding the unknown LinkedIn connections.

We also discuss the difference between a valuable network online network versus a large empty network.

But we want want to hear about your experiences. What do you do when you get an unknown LinkedIn connection? Post your comment below or on our Facebook Page, or on our Google+ page, or in our LinkedIn group, or on Pinterest, or send us an email at youngprpros@gmail.com, or send us a message on Twitter @youngprpros@kristinesimpson or @kentjulia.

Direct download: YPP_61_FINAL.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

This week, Kristine Simpson and Julia Kent respond to a question from our good friend and devoted listener Sarah Bustard. She asks:

Sarah Bustard @sarahbustard
@YoungPRPros Looking for topics? I'd be interested in hearing @Kristinesimpson and @kentjulia's thoughts on this bit.ly/12eeREz

The article entitled Communications Strategists Deliberated on 60 Million in Cuts at Environment Canada, talks about how communicators were invited to attend a c-suite and major business meeting in order to be better prepared.

First Kristine and Julia talk about the positives of having communicators in these meetings. They also discuss how young communicators can work their way in to these meetings.

“This allowed an analysis of communication issues, stakeholder reactions and public perception to be weighed during the consideration of each and every proposal and had the added advantage of having communications staff familiar with the proposals, and ready to hit the ground running once the decisions were announced.”

Then, Kristine reacts to the negative stereotypes of the industry and gives her rebuttal to how some believe that communicators are simple there to communicate the decision and have no place in contributing to the business decisions.

“That sounds a bit backwards to me,” said Gary Corbett, president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada, which represents about 60,000 government scientists and professionals. “It’s wrong for communications people to be involved in deciding what decisions to make. Communications people are there to communicate the decisions after they’re made. It seems the government is just being political rather than (doing) what’s in the best interests of Canadians.”

We want to hear from you. Where do you stand? Should communicators be included in c-suite level meetings? And what are your suggestions to helping young professionals get in to those meetings too? Post your comment below or on our Facebook Page, or on our Google+ page, or in our LinkedIn group, or on Pinterest, or send us an email at youngprpros@gmail.com, or send us a message on Twitter @youngprpros@kristinesimpson or @kentjulia.

Direct download: YPP_60_FINAL.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

This week, hosts Kristine Simpson and Julia Kent talk about the ways the job search has changed. Your parents may have instilled job searching lessons in you as a child, but some of those lessons no longer apply.

In a Huffington Post article written by Joshua Waldman called 10 Ways The Job Search Has Changed, it says job searching has changed dramatically over the past few years. If you want to succeed, you’ll have to take a much different approach than you did previously.

Kristine and Julia comment on a few points in the article:

  1. Google has replaced the resumé. SEO is more important today than it ever was. Kristine shares some tricks on how you can make sure you look good on Google.
  2. A summary of your work history is enough. As mentioned in episode 53, there are 2000-3000 new PR and communications graduates every year in Canada. It is a competitive world out there, so summarize in a cover letter or at the top of your résumé why you should be the chosen candidate.
  3. Relationships come first, resumés second. Julia reminds the audience that the majority of PR/communications/marketing jobs are achieved by who you know and not what you know. Young PR Pros gives a bunch of useful tips on networking and building relationships in episode 48.
  4. Employers only care about what they want. Kristine reminds young pros your job search is not about you, but about the company. The best way to get a job is to find out what the company's business goals are and show how you could fulfill that need.
  5. Work gaps aren't big problems. Julia shares her work background to demonstrate that a diverse background with a few breaks can actually be good for your job search.
  6. And finally, Kristine errs on the side of caution when reading number 3: social proof is a must. Although it is nice to have letters of recommendations, Kristine doesn't beieve in LinkedIn endorsements, she shares her reasons and gives young pros other alternatives to social proof.

We want to hear from you. What is missing from this list? How do you think the job search has changed over the years? Post your comment below or on our Facebook Page, or on our Google+ page, or in our LinkedIn group, or on Pinterest, or send us an email at youngprpros@gmail.com, or send us a message on Twitter @youngprpros@kristinesimpson or @kentjulia.

Direct download: YPP_59_FINAL.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:50am EDT

This week, Kristine Simpson and Julia Kent add another episode in the bank of our Who to Follow series, where we profile young and young at heart PR professionals that deserve your follow on Twitter.

Today's profile is not of an individual person, but of a hashtag called #Jobline. Jobline is a highly targeted and effective job advertising service for Communications and Marketing professionals in Ottawa. The positions posted can include opportunities in communications, marketing, public relations, government and media relations, writing, editing and translation services, and more.

The hashtag #Jobline, created by IABC Ottawa - more specifically, Kristine, who also happens to be the Director of Jobline - is more than just tweets of job openings in Ottawa, it also has links to résumé building articles and interview tips. In fact, Young PR Pros tweets have been featured with the #Jobline hashtag before.

While Young PR Pros looks at the PR and communications industry as a whole from the eyes and ears of the young and young at heart professionals, following #Jobline will get you access to articles and tips on the hard skills of PR and communications.

Here are a few examples of #Jobline tweets.

We want to hear from you. Who do you think should be profiled as part of our next Who to Follow episode? Post your comment below or on our Facebook Page, or on our Google+ page, or in our LinkedIn group, or on Pinterest, or send us an email at youngprpros@gmail.com, or send us a message on Twitter @youngprpros@kristinesimpson or @kentjulia.

Direct download: YPP_58_FINAL.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:07pm EDT

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